Bears of Greater Yellowstone

Bears of Greater Yellowstone

$1,162.50
Dates:
June 5 - 8
Location:
Lamar Buffalo Ranch
Meals Included?:
No
Instructors:
Mark Haroldson, Sue Consolo-Murphy, M.S.
Audience Type:
Adult
Program Type:
Field Seminars
Program Subject:
Natural History, Wildlife

This is a combination classroom and field course aimed at increasing understanding and appreciation for bears (especially grizzlies) in the greater Yellowstone ecosystem--their biology, their ecological role and interrelations with other species in the ecosystem (including humans), the long and evolving history of their management, and how to enhance observing them and safely recreating and living in bear country. The main objectives are to 1) provide opportunities (no guarantee, of course!) to see bears in the wild and learn about their habitat, sign, and tracks to enhance searching success; 2) discuss bear biology and management in the greater Yellowstone area over the past few decades; 3) learn about bear-human conflicts and behaviors to enhance the safety of both species; and 4) have fun!  The course typically begins in the evening with a general introduction to bear biology and history, and progresses in time and depth of information throughout the 2+-day course, ending with a detailed update on the status of the ecosystem's grizzly bear population and current issues in science and management. While there is a natural focus on Yellowstone National Park as central to the history and recovery of this population, this course aims to promote understanding and appreciation of bears throughout the ecosystem and for the issues that challenge both bears and humans now and in the future.

About the instructors

Sue Consolo-Murphy worked with the National Park Service for nearly 40-years and retired as the chief of science and resource management at Grand Teton National Park. During her career she contributed to restoration of swift fox in South Dakota’s badlands and recovery of grizzly bears and their habitat in Yellowstone, among other natural and cultural resource efforts.

Mark Haroldson has been involved in grizzly and black bear research and management since 1976, working for the University of Montana, Colorado Division of Wildlife, and Hornocker Wildlife Institute. He has worked for the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem since 1984, where he is currently a USGS Supervisory Wildlife Biologist. He has authored or co-authored more than 50 peer-reviewed publications and 10 book chapters on a variety of topics related to grizzly bear ecology and population dynamics. His recent work has involved such diverse subjects as population estimation, energetics, nutrition, range expansion, bear-human interactions, and disease. Mark is also a member of the IUCN, Bear Specialist Group, North American Bear Expert Team.

Download Program Information:

Bears of Greater Yellowstone Course Letter

More Information:

We are continually updating and refining our COVID-19 mitigation measures to ensure the health and safety our guests, staff and volunteers. Read our COVID-19 guidelines for program participants.

SUMMER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Be prepared to hike up to 1 mile per day, comfortably, through relatively flat terrain on maintained trails.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 3 miles per day, comfortably, with elevation gains up to 600 feet. Some off-trail hiking possible.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 5 miles per day, comfortably, with occasional elevation gains up to 1000 feet in undulating terrain.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 8 miles per day, at a brisk pace, comfortably, with climbs up to 1500 feet on dirt trails. Loose rocks, uneven footing, and off-trail hiking are possible. Good coordination is recommended.
  • Be prepared for brisk aerobic, destination-oriented hiking up to 12 miles a day. You should be physically conditioned to do these hikes comfortably. Elevation changes up to 2000 feet on dirt trails or off-trail. Loose rock, uneven footing, steep hillside traverses, and stream crossings are possible. Good coordination is required.

WINTER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Leisurely hikes up to 1 mile per day through relatively flat terrain on maintained or snow-packed trails.
  • Hikes on snow-packed trails, or snowshoe or ski trips, up to 3 miles per day with climbs up to 250 feet.
  • Brisk hiking, snowshoeing, or skiing up to 5 miles per day with climbs up to 500 feet, including some trail-breaking in snow.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 8 miles per day with climbs up to 1000 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 12 miles per day with climbs up to 1500 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.