Coexisting with Carnivores

Coexisting with Carnivores

$1,029.50
Dates:
June 28-July 2
Location:
Lamar Buffalo Ranch
Meals Included?:
No
Instructors:
Joanna Lambert
Audience Type:
Adult
Program Type:
Field Seminars
Program Subject:
Natural History, Wildlife

Sold out: Please sign up for the waitlist.

Humans have shared landscapes with wild predators throughout our 200,000+ year evolutionary history. Historically, we had the knowledge to persist with these predators despite sometimes fierce competition. However, increasing urbanization and concerted efforts of shooting, poisoning, and trapping that began in the 1800s resulted in local extirpation of many of the world’s native carnivores, along with the knowledge of how to coexist with them.

In this class, we will explore the long history that humans have had with carnivores, with three overarching themes:

  1. The changing patterns of human interactions with predators over our history
  2. The circumstances that result in human-carnivore conflict versus coexistence and
  3. The conservation and management implications of human-carnivore interactions.

Though this class will provide the larger context of carnivore-human interactions in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, North America, and beyond, we will focus on the complexities of human interactions with grizzly bears, black bear, mountain lions, gray wolves, and coyotes.

About the instructor

Joanna Lambert, Ph.D., is a professor at the University of Colorado-Boulder. She has a deep passion for the natural world, resulting in a career spent publishing and teaching about the behavior, ecology, and conservation biology of wild mammals, especially primates and carnivores. Her research has taken her to every continent on the planet, though she has spent the most time (30+ years) in equatorial Africa and especially enjoys doing research and teaching in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

Download Program Information:

Course Letter

More Information:

We are continually updating and refining our COVID-19 mitigation measures to ensure the health and safety our guests, staff and volunteers. Read our COVID-19 guidelines for program participants.

SUMMER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Be prepared to hike up to 1 mile per day, comfortably, through relatively flat terrain on maintained trails.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 3 miles per day, comfortably, with elevation gains up to 600 feet. Some off-trail hiking possible.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 5 miles per day, comfortably, with occasional elevation gains up to 1000 feet in undulating terrain.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 8 miles per day, at a brisk pace, comfortably, with climbs up to 1500 feet on dirt trails. Loose rocks, uneven footing, and off-trail hiking are possible. Good coordination is recommended.
  • Be prepared for brisk aerobic, destination-oriented hiking up to 12 miles a day. You should be physically conditioned to do these hikes comfortably. Elevation changes up to 2000 feet on dirt trails or off-trail. Loose rock, uneven footing, steep hillside traverses, and stream crossings are possible. Good coordination is required.

WINTER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Leisurely hikes up to 1 mile per day through relatively flat terrain on maintained or snow-packed trails.
  • Hikes on snow-packed trails, or snowshoe or ski trips, up to 3 miles per day with climbs up to 250 feet.
  • Brisk hiking, snowshoeing, or skiing up to 5 miles per day with climbs up to 500 feet, including some trail-breaking in snow.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 8 miles per day with climbs up to 1000 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 12 miles per day with climbs up to 1500 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.