Fall Advanced Wildlife Photography

Fall Advanced Wildlife Photography

$644 | Tuition
Dates:
September 28 - October 2
Location:
Gardiner, Montana
Meals Included?:
No
Instructors:
Meg Sommers
Audience Type:
Adult
Program Type:
Field Seminars
Program Subject:
Photography

Is your camera one of your best friends? Do you want to learn more about wildlife and how to tell their stories? Do you want to take your photography to the next level while learning how you can help conserve what you love? Then come immerse yourself with fellow enthusiasts in the heart of Yellowstone. In this advanced class, you should have a good grasp of your photography fundamentals before you come. We will be focused on looking for the story, how to tell it, and why it is important. With full days in the field, you will have plenty of opportunities to find them!

About the Instructor

Meg Sommers has been an outdoor enthusiast since early childhood. A resident of Cody, she has been photographing seriously in Yellowstone National Park since 1990. Meg’s photography covers the full spectrum from landscapes landscape and wildlife to flowers. Her passion, however, is to photograph and tell the stories of wildlife, and she has traveled worldwide to seek out new and interesting opportunities to do so. After 20 years in practice, in 2006, she decided to retire as an attorney and judge to photograph full-time.

Sommers has served as a judge in photo competitions and is a grand prize winner in the Wyoming Wildlife photography competition. She recently added to her list of awards the grand prize in the 2022 Outdoor Photographer Magazine’s Wildlife Photo Contest. Sommers was also featured as a naturalist and professional photographer in a 15-minute video aired on French television about Yellowstone National Park.

Since 2010 she has had the privilege to teach nature and wildlife photography in Yellowstone for Yellowstone Forever and for Road Scholars since 2012. Sommers loves teaching both the fundamentals of photography to adult students as well as teaching advanced photography skills. Her hope is that in doing so, she is helping her students gain a greater insight into the natural world that surrounds us.

Testimonials

"The highlight was photographing two grizzly bears together on the final day. Each day was great. Meg is an excellent instructor and guide -- knowledgeable, challenging, and thoughtful. Fellow participants were good-humored and considerate, and the volunteer staff/drivers contributed a lot to the enjoyment and safety of the experience." - Dave, ID

"Meg and the Yellowstone Forever staff were great. Meg is very knowledgeable about the park and the wildlife. I enjoyed the other people in the group." - James, WA

Download Program Information:

Fall Advanced Wildlife Photography Course Letter

More Information:

We are continually updating and refining our COVID-19 mitigation measures to ensure the health and safety our guests, staff and volunteers. Read our COVID-19 guidelines for program participants.

SUMMER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Be prepared to hike up to 1 mile per day, comfortably, through relatively flat terrain on maintained trails.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 3 miles per day, comfortably, with elevation gains up to 600 feet. Some off-trail hiking possible.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 5 miles per day, comfortably, with occasional elevation gains up to 1000 feet in undulating terrain.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 8 miles per day, at a brisk pace, comfortably, with climbs up to 1500 feet on dirt trails. Loose rocks, uneven footing, and off-trail hiking are possible. Good coordination is recommended.
  • Be prepared for brisk aerobic, destination-oriented hiking up to 12 miles a day. You should be physically conditioned to do these hikes comfortably. Elevation changes up to 2000 feet on dirt trails or off-trail. Loose rock, uneven footing, steep hillside traverses, and stream crossings are possible. Good coordination is required.

WINTER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Leisurely hikes up to 1 mile per day through relatively flat terrain on maintained or snow-packed trails.
  • Hikes on snow-packed trails, or snowshoe or ski trips, up to 3 miles per day with climbs up to 250 feet.
  • Brisk hiking, snowshoeing, or skiing up to 5 miles per day with climbs up to 500 feet, including some trail-breaking in snow.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 8 miles per day with climbs up to 1000 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 12 miles per day with climbs up to 1500 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.