Mammal Signs: Interpreting Tracks, Scat, and Hair

Mammal Signs: Interpreting Tracks, Scat, and Hair

$1,148.75
Dates:
May 21-26
Location:
Lamar Buffalo Ranch
Meals Included?:
No
Instructors:
Jim Halfpenny, Ph.D.
Audience Type:
Adult
Program Type:
Field Seminars
Program Subject:
Wildlife

Mammals are elusive and hard to observe in the wild, but you can discover their behavior in the signs they leave behind.

Through illustrated lectures and laboratories, you’ll learn about natural history, ecology, anatomy, gaits, track averaging, relative size, estimating track age and speed, identifying prints, finding clues, and following trails.

During afternoons in the field, you’ll put your learning into practice as you explore animal behavior by reading the stories that tracks tell. Evenings will be spent analyzing data collected in the field. Expect to be hiking off trails, in mud, and wading in water.

About the instructor

Jim Halfpenny, Ph.D., travels the world teaching about bears, wolves, animal tracks, and cold ecosystems. He produces educational books, computer programs, and videos. He coordinated the Long-Term Ecological and Alpine Research programs at the University of Colorado. His books include Yellowstone Wolves in the Wild and Yellowstone Bears in the Wild.

Download Program Information:

Course Letter

More Information:

We are continually updating and refining our COVID-19 mitigation measures to ensure the health and safety our guests, staff and volunteers. Read our COVID-19 guidelines for program participants.

SUMMER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Be prepared to hike up to 1 mile per day, comfortably, through relatively flat terrain on maintained trails.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 3 miles per day, comfortably, with elevation gains up to 600 feet. Some off-trail hiking possible.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 5 miles per day, comfortably, with occasional elevation gains up to 1000 feet in undulating terrain.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 8 miles per day, at a brisk pace, comfortably, with climbs up to 1500 feet on dirt trails. Loose rocks, uneven footing, and off-trail hiking are possible. Good coordination is recommended.
  • Be prepared for brisk aerobic, destination-oriented hiking up to 12 miles a day. You should be physically conditioned to do these hikes comfortably. Elevation changes up to 2000 feet on dirt trails or off-trail. Loose rock, uneven footing, steep hillside traverses, and stream crossings are possible. Good coordination is required.

WINTER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Leisurely hikes up to 1 mile per day through relatively flat terrain on maintained or snow-packed trails.
  • Hikes on snow-packed trails, or snowshoe or ski trips, up to 3 miles per day with climbs up to 250 feet.
  • Brisk hiking, snowshoeing, or skiing up to 5 miles per day with climbs up to 500 feet, including some trail-breaking in snow.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 8 miles per day with climbs up to 1000 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 12 miles per day with climbs up to 1500 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.