Owls of Yellowstone

Owls of Yellowstone

$341.25
Dates:
June 7-8
Location:
Gardiner, Montana
Meals Included?:
No
Instructors:
Katy Duffy, M.S.
Audience Type:
Adult
Program Type:
Field Seminars
Program Subject:
Wildlife

Sold out: Please sign up for the waitlist.

Are you fascinated by owls—their huge eyes and fabled hearing, their secretive habits and cryptic beauty? Through talks and field trips, you’ll explore how these adaptations work and why they help owls successfully live in Yellowstone. Visit places in the park that owls call home to find out why these habitats work so well for them. You’ll learn to read other park landscapes for signs of good owl habitat, and read signs that these secretive birds leave as clues. You might even see owls hunting in daylight—and find out why this suits them so well.

Note: No lodging is provided for this course. You can find more information on Gardiner-based lodging in the course letter below.

About the instructor

Katy Duffy, M.S., has been a licensed bird bander specializing in diurnal raptors, owls and songbirds for more than 40 years. She has also conducted late winter – spring surveys for advertising male forest owls in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks for 23 years. She has counted diurnal raptors in Yellowstone National Park during fall migration since 2010. She has given programs and taught classes on diurnal raptors and owls of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem for more than 20 years.

Katy worked for the National Park Service in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks for 32 years. She was a supervisory resource education ranger in Yellowstone and a ranger-naturalist in Grand Teton. She has a M.S. in ecology from Rutgers University.

Download Program Information:

Course Letter

More Information:

We are continually updating and refining our COVID-19 mitigation measures to ensure the health and safety our guests, staff and volunteers. Read our COVID-19 guidelines for program participants.

SUMMER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Be prepared to hike up to 1 mile per day, comfortably, through relatively flat terrain on maintained trails.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 3 miles per day, comfortably, with elevation gains up to 600 feet. Some off-trail hiking possible.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 5 miles per day, comfortably, with occasional elevation gains up to 1000 feet in undulating terrain.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 8 miles per day, at a brisk pace, comfortably, with climbs up to 1500 feet on dirt trails. Loose rocks, uneven footing, and off-trail hiking are possible. Good coordination is recommended.
  • Be prepared for brisk aerobic, destination-oriented hiking up to 12 miles a day. You should be physically conditioned to do these hikes comfortably. Elevation changes up to 2000 feet on dirt trails or off-trail. Loose rock, uneven footing, steep hillside traverses, and stream crossings are possible. Good coordination is required.

WINTER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Leisurely hikes up to 1 mile per day through relatively flat terrain on maintained or snow-packed trails.
  • Hikes on snow-packed trails, or snowshoe or ski trips, up to 3 miles per day with climbs up to 250 feet.
  • Brisk hiking, snowshoeing, or skiing up to 5 miles per day with climbs up to 500 feet, including some trail-breaking in snow.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 8 miles per day with climbs up to 1000 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 12 miles per day with climbs up to 1500 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.