The Geology of Ecology: Caldera Communities, Northern Range Niches, and More

The Geology of Ecology: Caldera Communities, Northern Range Niches, and More

$998.50
Dates:
July 9-13
Location:
Lamar Buffalo Ranch
Meals Included?:
No
Instructors:
Paul Doss, Ph.D.
Audience Type:
Adult
Program Type:
Field Seminars
Program Subject:
Geology, Natural History

People often overlook the non-living parts of an ecosystem. And yet, the underlying geology and climatic conditions are what form the foundation for every square inch of Earth’s living space. In Yellowstone, that foundation is fertile, and deadly, brutally cold, and fatally hot, sweeping and green, and steep and rocky. This seminar will illuminate the linkages among the solid, wet Earth, and the abundant, diverse life that not just lives in Yellowstone, but thrives in Yellowstone.

About the instructor

Paul Doss, Ph.D., makes geology come alive for his students. A former supervisory geologist for Yellowstone National Park, he now teaches in the Department of Geology and Physics at the University of Southern Indiana. For more than three decades, he has taught field geology, conducted research, and completed geologic mapping in the Rocky Mountain Region and the Yellowstone Plateau.

Download Program Information:

Course Letter

More Information:

We are continually updating and refining our COVID-19 mitigation measures to ensure the health and safety our guests, staff and volunteers. Read our COVID-19 guidelines for program participants.

SUMMER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Be prepared to hike up to 1 mile per day, comfortably, through relatively flat terrain on maintained trails.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 3 miles per day, comfortably, with elevation gains up to 600 feet. Some off-trail hiking possible.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 5 miles per day, comfortably, with occasional elevation gains up to 1000 feet in undulating terrain.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 8 miles per day, at a brisk pace, comfortably, with climbs up to 1500 feet on dirt trails. Loose rocks, uneven footing, and off-trail hiking are possible. Good coordination is recommended.
  • Be prepared for brisk aerobic, destination-oriented hiking up to 12 miles a day. You should be physically conditioned to do these hikes comfortably. Elevation changes up to 2000 feet on dirt trails or off-trail. Loose rock, uneven footing, steep hillside traverses, and stream crossings are possible. Good coordination is required.

WINTER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Leisurely hikes up to 1 mile per day through relatively flat terrain on maintained or snow-packed trails.
  • Hikes on snow-packed trails, or snowshoe or ski trips, up to 3 miles per day with climbs up to 250 feet.
  • Brisk hiking, snowshoeing, or skiing up to 5 miles per day with climbs up to 500 feet, including some trail-breaking in snow.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 8 miles per day with climbs up to 1000 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 12 miles per day with climbs up to 1500 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.