Where the Bison Roam

Where the Bison Roam

$211
Dates:
August 21
Location:
Gardiner, Montana
Meals Included?:
No
Instructors:
Robert B. Pickering, Ph.D.
Audience Type:
Adult
Program Type:
Field Seminars
Program Subject:
Cultural History, Day Trip, Natural History, Wildlife

Bison are one of the most interesting, enigmatic and important species in North America. They are part of the important story of climate change for the Ice Age to the Holocene and are considered to be a keystone species of the plains. Bison and humans have interacted for at least 10-12, 000 years in North America. The human/bison connection goes back even further in Europe.

During this one-day session you will learn about the importance of bison in natural history and to a succession of human cultures in North America including our own. Much of the discussion will occur while the group is out looking at bison.

About the instructor

Dr. Robert B. Pickering, Ph.D., is the founding director of the Museum Science and Management program at the University of Tulsa. In 1984, he received a Ph.D. in Physical Anthropology from Northwestern University after earning his BA and MA degrees in Anthropology from Southern Illinois University-Carbondale.

Pickering has served as an educator, curator, and administrator in major American museums over the last 30 years. Combined, these experiences give Pickering broad and deep knowledge of museum philosophy and practice. At each museum in which he served, Dr. Pickering has planned, promoted, and taught classes and programs for a broad spectrum of audiences. He is committed to public education and lifelong learning.

Download Program Information:

Course Letter

More Information:

We are continually updating and refining our COVID-19 mitigation measures to ensure the health and safety our guests, staff and volunteers. Read our COVID-19 guidelines for program participants.

SUMMER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Be prepared to hike up to 1 mile per day, comfortably, through relatively flat terrain on maintained trails.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 3 miles per day, comfortably, with elevation gains up to 600 feet. Some off-trail hiking possible.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 5 miles per day, comfortably, with occasional elevation gains up to 1000 feet in undulating terrain.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 8 miles per day, at a brisk pace, comfortably, with climbs up to 1500 feet on dirt trails. Loose rocks, uneven footing, and off-trail hiking are possible. Good coordination is recommended.
  • Be prepared for brisk aerobic, destination-oriented hiking up to 12 miles a day. You should be physically conditioned to do these hikes comfortably. Elevation changes up to 2000 feet on dirt trails or off-trail. Loose rock, uneven footing, steep hillside traverses, and stream crossings are possible. Good coordination is required.

WINTER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Leisurely hikes up to 1 mile per day through relatively flat terrain on maintained or snow-packed trails.
  • Hikes on snow-packed trails, or snowshoe or ski trips, up to 3 miles per day with climbs up to 250 feet.
  • Brisk hiking, snowshoeing, or skiing up to 5 miles per day with climbs up to 500 feet, including some trail-breaking in snow.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 8 miles per day with climbs up to 1000 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 12 miles per day with climbs up to 1500 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.