Yellowstone Birds: An Introduction

Yellowstone Birds: An Introduction

$312.50
Dates:
May 15 - 16
Location:
Gardiner, Montana
Meals Included?:
No
Instructors:
Forrest Rowland
Audience Type:
Adult
Program Type:
Field Seminars
Program Subject:
Wildlife

This course is designed to not only impart beginner-to-intermediate level understanding of the natural lives and natural history of birds, but to get you out in the field to watch them in action. The sheer beauty of Yellowstone’s birds, against the most delightful backdrop in the lower 48, is reason enough to be excited about the time we will spend together. For me, much of the joy of watching birds is understanding and delighting in their behaviors and their forms. While migratory bird species escape the harshness of Winter, by exploring the avian world of the park before the height of migration allows us time to become acquainted with the hardiest of birds in North America: Yellowstone’s residents. From Swans and other dazzling waterfowl, to displaying Grouse and drumming Woodpeckers, we will have the opportunity to experience and enjoy the lion’s share of the fun species that call this remarkable place home. Expect a few short hours of classtime, and be sure to bring a notebook. Most of our time together will be spent in the field, watching the birds and interpreting what they do, why they are shaped the way they are, what structures they’ve evolved to be able to thrive here, and how they interact with their environment to complete the picture of Yellowstone’s fascinating ecology.

About the instructor

Forrest Rowland is a published ornithologist and photographer who has happily resided in the Greater Yellowstone Ecoregion for the past 13 years. Beyond becoming intimately familiar with the resident and migratory birds of our region, he is an expert in the birds of Montana, the United States, and South America, where he has held or currently holds seats on Rare Bird Commitees, conservation committees and non-profit boards. During the course of his career in avian conservation biology, expedition planning, ecotourism business development, and photography Forrest has been honored to lead birding and wildlife adventures in more than 50 countries on 6 continents. He is excited to bring his passion for birds and ecology to this course, and share his knowledge and love of Yellowstone’s amazing animals with you!

Download Program Information:

Yellowstone Birds: An Introduction Course Letter

More Information:

We are continually updating and refining our COVID-19 mitigation measures to ensure the health and safety our guests, staff and volunteers. Read our COVID-19 guidelines for program participants.

SUMMER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Be prepared to hike up to 1 mile per day, comfortably, through relatively flat terrain on maintained trails.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 3 miles per day, comfortably, with elevation gains up to 600 feet. Some off-trail hiking possible.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 5 miles per day, comfortably, with occasional elevation gains up to 1000 feet in undulating terrain.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 8 miles per day, at a brisk pace, comfortably, with climbs up to 1500 feet on dirt trails. Loose rocks, uneven footing, and off-trail hiking are possible. Good coordination is recommended.
  • Be prepared for brisk aerobic, destination-oriented hiking up to 12 miles a day. You should be physically conditioned to do these hikes comfortably. Elevation changes up to 2000 feet on dirt trails or off-trail. Loose rock, uneven footing, steep hillside traverses, and stream crossings are possible. Good coordination is required.

WINTER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Leisurely hikes up to 1 mile per day through relatively flat terrain on maintained or snow-packed trails.
  • Hikes on snow-packed trails, or snowshoe or ski trips, up to 3 miles per day with climbs up to 250 feet.
  • Brisk hiking, snowshoeing, or skiing up to 5 miles per day with climbs up to 500 feet, including some trail-breaking in snow.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 8 miles per day with climbs up to 1000 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 12 miles per day with climbs up to 1500 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.