Yellowstone Master Naturalist | Summer

Yellowstone Master Naturalist | Summer

$1,005 | Tuition
Dates:
August 24 - 29
Location:
Gardiner, Montana
Meals Included?:
No
Instructors:
Amanda Evans
Audience Type:
Adult
Program Type:
Field Seminars
Program Subject:
Cultural History, Natural History, Professional Development

There is no better outdoor classroom than the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem – one of the largest nearly intact temperate-zone ecosystems in the world. Yellowstone's wealth of natural and cultural diversity includes the largest concentration of hydrothermal features, 10,000+ years of vast human history, an abundance of wildlife, varied vegetation, numerous lakes, rivers, and creeks, and unique geologic wonders. In this certificate-level course, you will learn in-depth about this unique and amazing ecosystem. Through a variety of outings, guest speakers, activities, and lectures, you will gain the skills of a Yellowstone naturalist and will encounter a diversity of habitat types. During this week-long course, you will learn to understand and interpret wildlife, geology, plants, cultural history, and ecological management of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. With completion of this course, you will be provided a Yellowstone Naturalist certification in addition to a Montana Master Naturalist certification, through the Montana Natural History Center.

About the instructor

Amanda Evans is a Yellowstone Forever lead field educator. Her passion for wildlife and wild places has taken her to working in California, Texas, Wyoming, Alaska, and Montana. She feels that it is through firsthand experience with the natural world that people build the strongest connections to it. Her goal is to use education to foster the same appreciation she feels and to inspire others to preserve and protect nature in all spaces.

Testimonials

"I warn you, I may do another one some time." - Paul, CO

"The facilities at the Overlook are great, all of the staff that I interacted with were professional and well informed. I always felt welcome and like I was among peers, even when I was completely out of my element (learning to draw and journal) Thank you for your kindness and patience. - Tatiana, IL

"It was truly a life long valued experience!" - Francine, CO

"I will definitely do more courses with YF." - George, NV

"Instructors were superb, class size was fantastic. It left me craving for more!" - Elaine, AZ

Download Program Information:

Yellowstone Master Naturalist | Summer Course Letter

More Information:

We are continually updating and refining our COVID-19 mitigation measures to ensure the health and safety our guests, staff and volunteers. Read our COVID-19 guidelines for program participants.

SUMMER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Be prepared to hike up to 1 mile per day, comfortably, through relatively flat terrain on maintained trails.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 3 miles per day, comfortably, with elevation gains up to 600 feet. Some off-trail hiking possible.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 5 miles per day, comfortably, with occasional elevation gains up to 1000 feet in undulating terrain.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 8 miles per day, at a brisk pace, comfortably, with climbs up to 1500 feet on dirt trails. Loose rocks, uneven footing, and off-trail hiking are possible. Good coordination is recommended.
  • Be prepared for brisk aerobic, destination-oriented hiking up to 12 miles a day. You should be physically conditioned to do these hikes comfortably. Elevation changes up to 2000 feet on dirt trails or off-trail. Loose rock, uneven footing, steep hillside traverses, and stream crossings are possible. Good coordination is required.

WINTER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Leisurely hikes up to 1 mile per day through relatively flat terrain on maintained or snow-packed trails.
  • Hikes on snow-packed trails, or snowshoe or ski trips, up to 3 miles per day with climbs up to 250 feet.
  • Brisk hiking, snowshoeing, or skiing up to 5 miles per day with climbs up to 500 feet, including some trail-breaking in snow.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 8 miles per day with climbs up to 1000 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 12 miles per day with climbs up to 1500 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.