Autumn Wildlife Watching

Autumn Wildlife Watching

$745
Dates:
Sept. 1-5
Location:
Lamar Buffalo Ranch
Meals Included?:
No
Instructors:
Sam Archibald
Audience Type:
Adult
Program Type:
Field Seminars
Program Subject:
Wildlife

Welcome to Yellowstone’s Northern Range! This iconic stretch of mountains, meadows, rivers, and glacial valleys lies at the heart of the greater Yellowstone Ecosystem and is home to 14 carnivores, 8 ungulates, over 200 birds, as well as rodents, reptiles, and many other species. During this program, we will spend three days looking for and discussing the amazing diversity of wildlife that makes its home in this rangeland, from mammals to birds to reptiles to insects. Discussions will focus on who lives here and how these animals fit into the greater Yellowstone ecosystem. We will spend most of our time in the field watching as many different species as possible.

Although much of our viewing may be possible from the road, short hikes each day (up to 3 miles) will help increase our chances of seeing certain species and give us a deeper appreciation and understanding of the plants and animals that make up this dynamic wildlife habitat. Signs and tracks of various species will also be examined on these hikes.

Be prepared to be outside in Yellowstone’s late summer and autumn weather. We will have a few extra pairs of binoculars for those who do not have any and will provide spotting scopes for those harder-to-see animals. We will use a variety of materials designed to assist in identifying the animals, plants we encounter.

Included is a tentative itinerary below, but the bulk of the program can be adapted to people’s interests. We will seek a better understanding of what niche each species plays in Yellowstone, and the management concerns that surround many of our more controversial and/or threatened species. Open discussion is always encouraged, so bring your questions, concerns, and even personal experiences with you as we explore one of the most intact and diverse ecosystems on the planet

Download Program Information:

Autumn Wildlife Watching Program Itinerary

More Information:

We are continually updating and refining our COVID-19 mitigation measures to ensure the health and safety our guests, staff and volunteers. Read our COVID-19 guidelines for program participants.

SUMMER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Be prepared to hike up to 1 mile per day, comfortably, through relatively flat terrain on maintained trails.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 3 miles per day, comfortably, with elevation gains up to 600 feet. Some off-trail hiking possible.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 5 miles per day, comfortably, with occasional elevation gains up to 1000 feet in undulating terrain.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 8 miles per day, at a brisk pace, comfortably, with climbs up to 1500 feet on dirt trails. Loose rocks, uneven footing, and off-trail hiking are possible. Good coordination is recommended.
  • Be prepared for brisk aerobic, destination-oriented hiking up to 12 miles a day. You should be physically conditioned to do these hikes comfortably. Elevation changes up to 2000 feet on dirt trails or off-trail. Loose rock, uneven footing, steep hillside traverses, and stream crossings are possible. Good coordination is required.

WINTER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Leisurely hikes up to 1 mile per day through relatively flat terrain on maintained or snow-packed trails.
  • Hikes on snow-packed trails, or snowshoe or ski trips, up to 3 miles per day with climbs up to 250 feet.
  • Brisk hiking, snowshoeing, or skiing up to 5 miles per day with climbs up to 500 feet, including some trail-breaking in snow.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 8 miles per day with climbs up to 1000 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 12 miles per day with climbs up to 1500 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.