Spring Babies

Spring Babies

$712.50
Dates:
May 28-31
Location:
Lamar Buffalo Ranch
Meals Included?:
No
Instructors:
Shauna Baron
Audience Type:
Adult
Program Type:
Field Seminars
Program Subject:
Natural History, Wildlife

Sold out: Please sign up for the waitlist.

It’s spring! And time to look for spring babies in the wilds of Yellowstone. You’ll look for bear cubs, wolf pups, bison calves, elk calves, bighorn lambs, and lots of young birds. Find them with spotting scopes and binoculars, and by taking short walks to better vantage points.

As you search, you’ll also talk about why species choose certain birthing grounds, and how they protect and raise their young. Expect to be outside from before dawn throughout the day to after sun-down. Even so, you’ll have plenty of free time to enjoy all aspects of Yellowstone’s vibrant spring.

About the instructor

Shauna Baron, M.S. holds a B.S. in Biology, and a M.S. in Science Education. She has had over 25 years of experience as an outdoor educator. She has participated in numerous wildlife studies throughout the U.S., including wolves, bears, fishers, bobcats, sea turtles, swans, pelicans and ravens. Shauna saw her first wild wolf while volunteering for the Yellowstone Wolf Project in 1996 and she has been working to protect wolves ever since. For the past 17 years, she has been working as a naturalist guide in Yellowstone National Park, developing outdoor educational classes for the Yellowstone Institute and Yellowstone Insight. She is a published author and editor, and when she is not writing or guiding a group, she can be found sitting on a hill watching wildlife, with a scope to her eye or book in her lap.

Download Program Information:

Course Letter

More Information:

We are continually updating and refining our COVID-19 mitigation measures to ensure the health and safety our guests, staff and volunteers. Read our COVID-19 guidelines for program participants.

SUMMER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Be prepared to hike up to 1 mile per day, comfortably, through relatively flat terrain on maintained trails.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 3 miles per day, comfortably, with elevation gains up to 600 feet. Some off-trail hiking possible.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 5 miles per day, comfortably, with occasional elevation gains up to 1000 feet in undulating terrain.
  • Be prepared to hike up to 8 miles per day, at a brisk pace, comfortably, with climbs up to 1500 feet on dirt trails. Loose rocks, uneven footing, and off-trail hiking are possible. Good coordination is recommended.
  • Be prepared for brisk aerobic, destination-oriented hiking up to 12 miles a day. You should be physically conditioned to do these hikes comfortably. Elevation changes up to 2000 feet on dirt trails or off-trail. Loose rock, uneven footing, steep hillside traverses, and stream crossings are possible. Good coordination is required.

WINTER ACTIVITY LEVEL SCALE

  • Leisurely hikes up to 1 mile per day through relatively flat terrain on maintained or snow-packed trails.
  • Hikes on snow-packed trails, or snowshoe or ski trips, up to 3 miles per day with climbs up to 250 feet.
  • Brisk hiking, snowshoeing, or skiing up to 5 miles per day with climbs up to 500 feet, including some trail-breaking in snow.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 8 miles per day with climbs up to 1000 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.
  • Brisk aerobic snowshoeing or skiing up to 12 miles per day with climbs up to 1500 feet; or steep, rugged, off-trail skiing or snowshoeing—including breaking trail in variable snow conditions.